Myrrh…and Frankincense. Damn Good Smells!


allure


WARNING: If you decide to ignore my warning and smell them anyway, you will be cast into a world of great nasal pleasures, for the duration of your inhalation. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.
You may risk sudden happiness, loss of stress, damage to your lower ego and permanent memories.

As for the you will die part…well…..you will.
Eventually. Lol. Or maybe not lol…lol. (had to suck you into the video somehow!)
Peace-

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NOTES:
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Definition: Myrrh is an expensive spice, used for making perfume, incense, medicine, and for anointing the dead.

Myrrh appears frequently in the Old Testament, primarily as a sensuous perfume in the Song of Solomon.

The Bible records myrrh showing up three times in the life and death of Jesus Christ. Matthew states that the Three Kings visited the child Jesus, bringing gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. Mark notes that when Jesus was dying on the cross, someone offered him wine mixed with myrrh to stop the pain, but he did not take it. Finally, John says Nicodemus brought a mixture of 75 pounds of myrrh and aloes to anoint Jesus’ body when it was laid in the tomb.

Myrrh comes from a small bushy tree, cultivated in ancient times in the Arabian peninsula. The grower made a small cut in the bark, where the resin would leak out. It was then collected and stored for about three months until it hardened into fragrant globules. Myrrh was used raw or crushed and mixed with oil to make a perfume. It was also used medicinally to reduce swelling and stop pain. Today myrrh is used in Chinese medicine for a variety of ailments.

Pronunciation: mur

Example: Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus packed Jesus’ body in myrrh, then wrapped it in linen cloths.

(Sources: itmonline.org and The Bible Almanac, edited by J.I. Packer, Merrill C. Tenney, and William White Jr.)

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—Description—The bushes yielding the resin do not grow more than 9 feet in height, but they are of sturdy build, with knotted branches, and branchlets that stand out at right-angles, ending in a sharp spine. The trifoliate leaves are scanty, small and very unequal, oval and entire. It was first recognized about 1822 at Ghizan on the Red Sea coast, a district so bare and dry that it is called ‘Tehama,’ meaning ‘hell.’

Botanically, there is still uncertainty about the origin and identity of the various species.

There are ducts in the bark, and the tissue between them breaks down, forming large cavities, which, with the remaining ducts, becomes filled with a granular secretion which is freely discharged when the bark is wounded, or from natural fissures. It flows as a pale yellow liquid, but hardens to a reddish-brown mass, being found in commerce in tears of many sizes, the average being that of a walnut. The surface is rough and powdered, and the pieces are brittle, with a granular fracture, semi-transparent, oily, and often show whitish marks. The odour and taste are aromatic, the latter also acrid and bitter. It is inflammable, but burns feebly.

Several species are recognized in commerce. It is usually imported in chests weighing 1 or 2 cwts., and wherever produced comes chiefly from the East Indies. Adulterations are not easily detected in the powder, so that it is better purchased in mass, when small stones, senegal gum, chestnuts, pieces of bdellium, or of a brownish resin called ‘false myrrh,’ may be sorted out with little difficulty.

It has been used from remote ages as an ingredient in incense, perfumes, etc., in the holy oil of the Jews and the Kyphi of the Egyptians for embalming and fumigations.

Little appears to be definitely known about the collection of myrrh. It seems probable that the best drug comes from Somaliland, is bought at the fairs of Berbera by the Banians of India, shipped to Bombay, and there sorted, the best coming to Europe and the worst being sent to China. The true myrrh is known in the markets as karam, formerly called Turkey myrrh, and the opaque bdellium as meena harma.

The gum makes a good mucilage and the insoluble residue from the tincture can be used in this way.
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Hope these helped, now get some!

Namaste-
Carpo

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